Saturday, May 28, 2011

Shibuya alley?

Hi and thanks for visiting my gallery page! These photos are from my travels - if you want to learn more about how I take these shots and who I learn from, visit http://www.runningronin.com.

This is what I personally consider "Shibuya Alley" - not knowing Japanese, but having been to Shibuya quite a few times, I started giving my own names to places - so while the photo you can find here is Shibuya Square, the photo above is - again - Shibuya Alley.

You can access it from the weird futuristic arc you see to the left of the Starbucks, looking towards the Qfront from the Metro (below).

Hi and thanks for visiting my gallery page! These photos are from my travels (I travel a lot for work) - if you want to learn more about how I take these shots and who I learn from, visit http://www.runningronin.com. 



The place is filled with little restaurants and shops, and extremely small pubs and mini-clubs. Layers upon layers of restaurants are piled in the tall buildings, and you can access them by narrow stairways or elevators with doors that open and close so quickly that getting in and out will make you feel like Indiana Jones. Just remember to have a good look at the illuminated panels outside to see if the photos of the food served in the restaurants make your mouth water, then go to your chosen restaurant and ask for an english menu.

It should sound like "egi menu-onegaishimas" or maybe more phonetically: eji meh-new o-neh-guy-she-mas. I suggest to leave if you dont get an english menu with photos on it.

As for the top photo... taking HDR photos of moving people is always a pain in the rear, but I do like a lot the effect of HDR mixed with street photography. Below is the process that took me to the end photo.

First of all, I took 3 photos at 3 different exposures:



By observing the girls on the right, you can notice how they are moving towards me photo after photo. This is bound to create some ghosting once we initiate the HDR process. So after running the pictures through Photomatix pro - here is the HDR output:


Look at all the ghosting and rips on the girls on the side!!!

As I explained on a previous post (the one on via Frattina, in Rome) I then use some layering to remove the ghosting effects. First of all, I need to select the original photo that resembles the most the HDR output. The third (and lightest) of my photo should do, then I just need to adjust settings like "vibrancy" and "temperature" to get it as close as possible to my HDR photo. Below is the output:


Now I proceed to layering in photoshop a stack of all the photos I originally took (from dark to light), then I stack on top of those the corrected photo from the lightest (just above), and finally the one I obtained from my HDR outpup. Through layering, I get to select which details of each photo I want to keep in my final photo. Essentially I'm cutting through the HDR photo to get to the layer below I like the most... (Trey Ratcliffe explains the process very well here).

So have a look at the HDR photo and the final photo one after the other - and now see all the small detail changes, the fixes and whatnot. Nothing that wasnt there has been inserted, but all the problems the software had in creating the high dynamic range effect, are now (almost) gone. :)





Finally its time to make use of all the light info we captured in this photo and use some Topaz, first to make some detail POP (!) then to remove all the crappy noise that the HDR process generated.


Finally - it's time for some cropping. But keep the original always - you might want to change your crop!!!




Hi and thanks for visiting my gallery page! These photos are from my travels - if you want to learn more about how I take these shots and who I learn from, visit http://www.runningronin.com.


As for the details: the Photo was:
  • Shot with my Nikon D90
  • HDRed with Photomatix Pro from a set of 3 photos - when using photomatix I adjusted luminosity and gamma correction till I almost completely removed the classic sky halos
  • Detail Enhanced in Topaz Asjust - Crisp setting.
  • Denoised in Topaz Denoise - Moderate setting
  • Cropped 
If you liked this photo, please go ahead and Like this page (button on the top right :)). Thanks!

No comments: