Running Ronin

The Cattleman's Dream

Hi and thanks for visiting my gallery page! These photos are from my travels (I travel a lot for work) - if you want to learn more about how I take these shots and who I learn from, visit http://www.runningronin.com.

The photo above is from inside the Driskill Hotel, the oldest operating hotel in Austin and one of the most famous hotels of Texas.An HDR photo classic I guess, as you can see how the dark interior is complemented by multiple sources of light that bounce off all the precious stones used in this lush hotel.



Below is an exterior photo of the Hotel, with the rickshaw drivers relaxing between one bout of cycling and anoter...

Hi and thanks for visiting my gallery page! These photos are from my travels (I travel a lot for work) - if you want to learn more about how I take these shots and who I learn from, visit http://www.runningronin.com.

From Wikipedia:
Jesse Driskill, a successful cattle baron, had moved to Texas from Missouri in 1849. Flush with cash from his service to the Confederate Army, to which he supplied beef throughout the Civil War, he decided to diversify by constructing a grand hotel in Austin, his adopted hometown. In 1884, Driskill purchased land at the corner of 6th and Brazos for $7,500 and announced his plans. He hired the architectural firm of Jasper N. Preston & Son to design the structure.
The hotel enjoyed a grand opening on December 20, 1886, and was featured in a special edition of the Austin Daily Statesman. On January 1, 1887, Governor Sul Ross held his inaugural ball in its ballroom, beginning a tradition for every Texas governor since.
Driskill unfortunately did not have the clientele to match the splendor of his four-star hotel. At a time when other hotels were 50 cents to one dollar per night, Driskill charged $2.50 to $5.00 (including meals), an exorbitant sum at what was then still relatively a Wild West town. Following the loss of a great fortune in cattle drives, Driskill was forced to close the hotel in May 1887, less than a year after it opened, when half his staff were poached by the Beach Hotel in Galveston.
According to legend, he finally lost the hotel in a game of poker in 1888 to his brother-in-law, Jim "Doc" Day, who became its second owner. Driskill died of a stroke in 1890.

A final view of the entrance lobby from a different angle:
Hi and thanks for visiting my gallery page! These photos are from my travels (I travel a lot for work) - if you want to learn more about how I take these shots and who I learn from, visit http://www.runningronin.com.

As for the details: the Photo was:
  • Shot with my Nikon D90
  • HDRed with Photomatix Pro from a set of 3 photo
  • Detail Enhanced in Topaz Asjust - Crisp setting
  • Denoised in Topaz Denoise - Moderate setting
  • Cropped and straightened with ShiftN
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